New Music For Old People: Band of Horses, Rural Alberta Advantage, Rusty Anderson

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Al Kooper

Al Kooper

This column is like the title says — its intention is to fill the gap for those of us who were satiated musically in the ’60s and then searched desperately as we aged for music we could relate to and get the same buzz from nowadaze. iTunes was the answer for me in 2003 and I have been following the new releases every Tuesday ever since I realized there was an endless stream of music I could enjoy there.

I also include older items that I felt were obscure originally and might not have been heard back then. The reason I am writing this column is to make sure others don’t miss this wonderful music. These are not top ten items; but they SHOULD’VE been!

1. “Everything’s Gonna Be Undone” — Band of Horses

Okay. Let’s calm down, head for the acoustic guitars, and fondly remember folk music. Ben Bridwell and Mat Brooke founded this puppy in Seattle in 2004. When Brooke departed to start yet another band, Bridwell moved the band to his native South Carolina, recording an album there that did quite well, topping the independent chart and reaching 35 on Billboard’s Top 200. They now have a strong foothold and hopefully will only get better and better.

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2. “The Breakup” — Rural Alberta Advantage

Another Canadian band. This one, from Toronto, is a good example of the little rock group who could. They formed in 2005, and from that year through 2008 they self-released a single, an EP, and an entire album entitled Hometowns. It was selected by online retailer eMusic as Album of the Month in November 2008. In 2009, they opened for Grizzly Bear at SXSW and they done good. Saddle Creek Records in Omaha bought distribution rights to Hometowns and released a spanking new RAA album in 2011. And here we are now. They are a trio led by Nils Edenloff and featuring Amy Cole and Paul Banwatt. There’s nothing like a self-made band. This is from their second album, Departing.

3. “Timed Exposure” — Rusty Anderson

Rusty Anderson has the “Al Kooper Curse.” Needless to say, I TOTALLY understand. His instrument of note is the electric guitar. He was born in La Habra, California in 1959. Rusty has played either in the studio or on the road with Paul McCartney, The Bangles, Animal Logic, Ricky Martin, and Neil Diamond, to mention but a few. There are solo albums as well. This is from one of them. He will continue helping others and making good solo albums that too few eschew. Hopefully he will break the curse. But then again, I’m in his corner…

This column originally appeared on The Morton Report. Click for more great selections from Al Kooper! As always, show some love to the Morton Report!

Photo Credit: Joe Mabel [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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