New Music For Old People: Lucinda Williams, Kat Edmonson, The Preatures



Al Kooper

Al Kooper

This column is like the title says — its intention is to fill the gap for those of us who were satiated musically in the ’60s and then searched desperately as we aged for music we could relate to and get the same buzz from nowadaze. iTunes was the answer for me in 2003 and I have been following the new releases every Tuesday ever since I realized there was an endless stream of music I could enjoy there.

I also include older items that I felt were obscure originally and might not have been heard back then. The reason I am writing this column is to make sure others don’t miss this wonderful music. These are not top ten items; but they SHOULD’VE been!

1. Lucinda Williams – “Walk On”

It’s hard to believe that Tom Petty could influence Lucinda, but here is aural proof. There’s actually a little Neil Young and John Hiatt thrown in there as well. This is from her recent double album, Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone, that just moved her up a notch or two. Improving with age, she is a special southern woman.

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2. Kat Edmonson – “All the Way”

She’s new to me, but this is the second track of hers that has made the column. She’s in Lucinda’s world (she’d be a great opener for LW) and this is a case where object simplicity works well.

3. The Preatures – “Two-Tone Melody”

You wouldn’t know it from listening, but this band is from Sydney, Australia and lead singer Izzi Manfredi sounds a bit like Dusty Springfield in the opening lines of this track from their debut album, Blue Planet Eyes, which is just out. That is not an easy thing to do. Makes me wanna come out of retirement and produce their next album. This band is gonna be gigantic eventually. You heard it here first!

This column originally appeared on The Morton Report. Click for more great selections from Al Kooper! As always, show some love to the Morton Report!

Photo Credit: Joe Mabel [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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